Engineering
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Bosch ignition coil

An ignition coil (also called a spark coil) is an induction coil in an automobile's ignition system.

How it works[]

This specific form of the autotransformer, together with the contact breaker, converts low voltage from a storage battery's 12 volts into thousands of volts, (high voltage) required by spark plugs in an internal combustion engine.

Improvement[]

In modern ignition systems each spark plug has its individual coil, sitting right on top of it, in a so called Direct Ignition (DI) module.

Early history[]

The disruptive discharge Tesla coil [1] is an early predecessor of the "ignition coil" in the ignition system. Tesla also gained Template:US patent, "Electrical Igniter for Gas Engines", on August 16, 1898. It used the principles of the ignition coil used today in automobiles. A. Atwater Kent [2], in 1921, patented the modern form of the ignition coil.

Related coils[]

  • A Oudin coil [3] is a disruptive discharge coil.

Patents[]

  • Template:US patenthttp://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/srchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=1391256.WKU.&OS=PN/1391256&RS=PN/1391256
    File:Igncoil.jpg

    Bosch ignition coil

  • Template:US patent - Induction coil structure - Arthur Atwater Kent - 1921
  • Template:US patent - Induction coil - Arthur Atwater Kent - 1923
  • Template:US patent - Induction coil - Arthur Atwater Kent - 1923
  • Template:US patent - Ignition coil - Arthur Atwater Kent - 1926
  • Template:US patent - Ignition system - Ernst Alexanderson [4]- 1929
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